Good bye Maria Eagle, hello Thornberry

Emily Thornberry, what do you know about UK Defence and the British Armed Forces besides wishes to unilaterally remove “Trident” aka the UK’s nuclear deterrent.

A quick search on “theyworkforyou” produces nothing of value on defence or the armed forces except maybe sexual assault issues.

Can her team teach her the ropes of defence or will she just scream about removing the nuclear deterrent?

Edit: She said

“”I have actually quite a lot more experience than people might think I do.
“I have a member of my family who is in the armed forces. I have a brother-in-law who is a general.
“I was actually made an honorary lieutenant colonel when I was doing court martials when I was a barrister and so I have a certain amount of experience of the military there.
“I have a regiment in my constituency. My father was a peacekeeper. He worked with forces all over the world in all sorts of warzones peacekeeping for the United Nations.
“He was Irish and I have to say he thought more highly of the British troops than he did of any other countries.”

That means:

Marry or get your family member into the military to be knowledgeable about defence.

Become a lawyer to charge soliders to know about defence. Also honorary ranks are great for your CV.

Make sure you have a “regiment in my constituency” (which? I can’t figure out) to be Shadow Secretary of State for Defence.

Make sure your daddy worked as a peacekeeper. If not, you are a dummy about defence.

Make sure your dad isn’t a Brit but he praised the British Armed Forces.

Welcome Lady Nugee!

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My take on Maria Eagle’s speech at the 2015 Labour Conference

With all the “hope and change” arising from dear beard-man (oops!) I mean Jeremy’s Corbyn’s leadership, I thought I’ll do quick critical review of Maria Eaagle’s speech on defence to the 2015 Labour Party Conference. My comments are in brackets and bold.

Conference,

Politics is changing. Since we lost the General Election, we have increased our membership by 164,000. (Hopefully many are related to the British Armed Forces or Defence. Maybe not.)

Our new leader, Jeremy Corbyn, is inspiring a new generation of members of our Party – people who had not thought politics was for them – but who now want to help us to change our society for the better.

I am honoured to have been asked by Jeremy to be the Shadow Secretary of State for Defence and I was proud to accept the job because the defence of our Country and its people is the first duty of any Government. (Sure you are, given your “experience” in the subject matter.)

And it must be taken equally seriously by any Party that seeks to govern.

I want to take this – my first opportunity – to thank and congratulate our magnificent British servicemen and women for the work that they do.

All around the world. Keeping us safe. Putting themselves in harm’s way on our behalf.

They do this despite the redundancies, the real terms cut to pay, pensions and allowances imposed on them by the Tories since 2010.

They are truly amongst our very finest and most dedicated public servants. (Blah, Blah, Blah, same old lines for years.)

And this Party will always acknowledge that and seek to look after them. After all, most recruits to the armed forces come from our Labour heartlands.(Really? So what did your party do to them from 2003 to 2010?)

I will use my new role as Chair of Labour Friends of the Forces, to help to strengthen and deepen the understanding between the Labour Party and our forces community. (As if your predecessors didn’t or failed to do.)

Just a day or two after my appointment, I had the opportunity to meet some of the 1000 servicemen and women who served in Sierra Leone tackling the Ebola epidemic.

At no small risk to themselves, they helped to defeat that scourge – a fantastic humanitarian achievement.

They also left behind six treatment centres and 4,000 trained local staff. (Actually, it is a combined effort of NHS, DFID and NGOs. Stop saying you did something by clapping for them.)

To help enable that nation to tackle and prevent any further outbreaks of contagious disease.

And the work that they did in West Africa helped keep us safe here at home also by ensuring the epidemic never reached our shores.

They have done a brilliant job.

I would also like to congratulate and thank all those service personnel on HMS Bulwark and HMS Enterprise.

To date, they have saved 5,577 desperate people fleeing persecution and war who would otherwise have drowned in the Mediterranean Sea. (Under David Cameron’s/Michael Fallon’s orders, not yours.)

The Royal Navy continues to contribute, with our EU partners to this vital work and we support it fully.

Conference,

Since we last met, our combat troops have left Afghanistan.

454 of them have lost their lives since 2001.

We acknowledge their sacrifice.

The security they have helped to provide has brought social progress to that country.

There are now six million children safely able to attend school in Afghanistan, two million of them girls. They are the future of their country and the more of them who are in education, the better. (As with Operation Gritrock, this was not performed by the British Armed Forces alone.)

Conference,

Our Nation’s defence has never been more important than it is now in an increasingly interconnected, unpredictable and dangerous world.
Where threats, new and re-emerging, come at us thick and fast. (Is that why your leader campaigned to stop wars and get out of NATO?)

Five years ago who would have anticipated the barbarism of ISIL/Daesh? Or the illegal annexation of Crimea by Russia? (Certainly not the Labour Party or Jeremy Corbyn.)

Certainly the 2010 Strategic Defence and Security Review did not.
It was a rushed, short sighted, Tory, Treasury-led cuts exercise giving us, amongst other things, a plan for aircraft carriers with no aircraft. (I wonder again, would Labour government have performed a better review???)

Our Country and our armed forces cannot afford a similarly poor effort from the Government in 2015.

Anticipating future threats is a difficult job though Conference. (Duh, so why aren’t you giving some ideas instead of swiping at the Tories?)
Who would have anticipated the millions of people fleeing conflict, drought and oppression in the Middle East – reminiscent of scenes we thought belonged to the history books? (Not you, not Jeremy Corbyn.)

It is the job of Government and those who aspire to govern, to ensure that Britain is ready and able to deal with any threat that arises and to be a force for good in the world.

And this fits in with our values as a Party. We believe in International cooperation, social justice and providing humanitarian assistance. (So why the campaign to aggressively remove the nuclear deterrent without spending on conventional weapons, why the hatred of the British Armed Forces, why the hatred of NATO?)

Britain is an outgoing nation fully engaged in the World.

We remain the only country to be a member of NATO, the EU, the UN Security Council, G7, G20 and the Commonwealth. (Great, you dear leader DID NOT like them at all!!!)

We have a unique opportunity and a great responsibility to use our position in the world to help solve problems, not turn our backs on them. (But, I read your fellow frontbencher Diane Abott doesn’t want intervention in Syria!)

We should not spurn that opportunity. We should not shirk that responsibility.

And we must ensure our people are safe here at home.
Our security services have warned that terrorist plotting against Britain is at its most intense for three decades – with six attempts foiled in the past 12 months

The collapse in stability and governance in the Middle East and North Africa has left a vacuum for extremists who seek to attack us at home and abroad.(But your party wants to let “refugees” in.)

The ongoing civil war and chaos in Syria has created space for ISIL/Daesh to unleash horrific atrocities on innocent people.

Britain cannot solve these problems alone. But Britain must not turn its back on the world. (So why did Jeremy Corbyn call to withdraw from NATO?)

This is the context for our deliberations about Britain’s role in the world and the defence capabilities we need, in conjunction with our allies and partners in playing that role.

For decades our policy has been that the UK should have responsive, high-tech armed forces with the capability to respond to emerging threats.

And it has been our position for decades too that Britain needs a credible independent nuclear deterrent while taking a lead internationally to push for a world without nuclear weapons. Labour in Government reduced the numbers of nuclear warheads and gave up our free fall nuclear bomb option – as part of multilateral disarmament efforts. (As Iceman said: Bullshit. Michael Foot didn’t. Jeremy Corbyn then and now did not.)

I know that some people have always disagreed that Britain should have an independent nuclear deterrent. (Right, many in your front bench.)

But we all agree that more must be done to rid the world of nuclear weapons. (Yes, how?)

I recognise and respect the different views in our party on the future of our nuclear deterrent.

Jeremy knew that I disagreed with him about this when he appointed me. And he still asked me to do the job. (Wonderful! Prepare to be kicked out of the role soon.)

At the last election, we were committed to having a much more transparent and public facing debate about our place in the world and how best we should fulfil it. (Really? So whose manifesto are you following? Ed Miliband or Jeremy Corbyn?)

Jeremy Corbyn has asked me to facilitate such a debate. (Really?!)

And I will do that. (With Jeremy pulling string no doubt.)

In sharp contrast to the Government’s SDSR consultation, where responses were limited to 300 words, it will be a debate that all of our members will be able to take part in. (Madame, this has been removed. And again, so far, you HAVE NOT provided any counter ideas.)

It will involve our trades union affiliates as well, some of whom represent:

The 40,000 people who work in the defence industries in Scotland,

The 7,500 who work in our submarine manufacturing industry

The 850 companies in the supply chain for the planned Vanguard successor submarines – all offering highly skilled jobs and apprenticeships.

For they have a legitimate interest in our deliberations also.
And it will be a debate that must also involve the British people – for these issues are amongst the most important that any politician ever has to consider. (Ahem!!! The government is doing just that. You’re quite late in the race!)

There is an appetite out there, in our Party and beyond, for real issues of substance to be discussed openly in politics, rather than be decided just by Ministers in Government, behind closed doors or politicians in Parliament, subject to a Party whip.

We’re seeing it surface in other political parties as well as our own.
Our debate is starting at this Conference.

It is right that Britain’s place in the world should be at the centre of these deliberations.

And Conference, I will make sure that it is. (Sure. So far you have said NOTHING noteworthy or of substance. A speech that won’t pass as an academic essay.)

***
PS: I’m too critical but this is what the people who voted for Jeremy Corbyn get.

Corbyn’s defence team

This site and owner is apolitical in British politics but I can’t just can’t help writing about beardman Jeremy Corbyn’s Shadow Defence frontbench.

Shadow Defence Secretary: Maria Eagle.
Formerly Shadow Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs for this whole week starting 14th September 2015, she has only tweeted one defence-related tweet and not asked a single written parliamentary question about defence. Her record shows she did ask very very rarely about defence issues and was a supporter of the 2003 Iraq War and the 2011 Libya intervention. And is, especially for the media, a support of the nuclear detrrent, aka ‘Trdent’. Still this current record shows nothing of value.

Kevan Jones–old timer from Miliband defence frontbench. Pro-nuclear deterrent and what’s more, pro-military. But he’s not the boss and lost a great boss named Vernon Coaker. Possibly stays as Shadow Minister for the Armed Forces.

Toby Perkins. Former Shadow Minister (Business, Innovation and Skills). Apparently he has asked some defence-related questions in the past. What role will he have? Shadowing Mark Lancaster?

Rachel Maskell. She’s a real newbie, never had a front bench post, only served on the health committee. This doesn’t sound promising.. She has asked about arms slaes and the military covenant. What’s more, she’s signed an Early Day Motion (EDM) regarding the upgrading on HMNB Clyde or Faslane. So she’s against the nuclear deterrent.

Here you are ladies and gentleman, you Corbyn formed, Eagle-led Shadow Defence team.

Hello there Maria Eagle

what do you know about Defence issues?

Your record:

Shadow Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Oct 2013 –
Shadow Secretary of State for Transport Oct 2010 – Oct 2013
Shadow Minister (Equalities Office) May 2010 – Oct 2010
Shadow Solicitor General May 2010 – Oct 2010
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (also in Government Equalities Office) Jun 2009 – May 2010
Minister of State (Government Equalities Office) (also in the Ministry of Justice) Jun 2009 – May 2010
Parliamentary Secretary (Government Equalities office) (also in the Ministry of Justice) Oct 2008 – Jun 2009
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice) Jul 2007 – Jun 2009
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Northern Ireland Office) May 2006 – Jun 2007
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education and Skills) (Children and Families) May 2005 – May 2006
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions) Jun 2001 – May 2005

Clearly no post ever held in defence, foreign affairs, or international affairs.

All hail Jeremy Corbyn’s team!